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Low Footprint Seafood in the Coral Triangle

Low Footprint Seafood in the Coral Triangle

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The WWF Coral Triangle Coordination Team recently announced the availability of a new report on Low Footprint Seafood in the Coral Triangle.

These men harvested about 4 tons of milkfish (chanos chanos) from this pond and fish immediately put to ice and brought to nearby processing plant for deboning and other processes. Alsons Aquaculture. Sarangani, Southern Mindanao, Philippines. (Photo by: Jürgen Freund / WWF)

These men harvested about 4 tons of milkfish (chanos chanos) from this pond and fish immediately put to ice and brought to nearby processing plant for deboning and other processes. Alsons Aquaculture. Sarangani, Southern Mindanao, Philippines. (Photo by: Jürgen Freund / WWF)

This report looks into measuring seafood footprint—an often neglected issue that could undermine future development of fisheries and aquaculture. A key influencer of this report has been the acknowledgement by a number of respected organizations such as the World Resources Institute that in the face of stable wild fish supply, human population increase, and rising per capita fish consumption, aquaculture production will likely need to double to meet seafood consumption demands. This will require policies and practices that manage environmental impacts.

This concise report addresses some of these issues and concerns in part by emphasizing the importance of measuring the efficiency of use of aquatic resources in seafood production as part of sustainability criteria to help identify the most resource-efficient seafood products. It is an important addition for countries, especially those in Southeast Asia that exhibit increasing per capita seafood consumption, to better understand where farmed seafood for the future will come from. It also provides an important basis for advocating national policy needs.

WWF hopes this report will be useful for engagement with national governments, industry partners, and other stakeholders in the Coral Triangle region to bring about sustainable aquaculture.

By combining seafood footprint with tools that measure a wide range of environmental issues, a broader and more complete picture of sustainability is possible.

DOWNLOAD the report here.

(Story courtesy of WWF.)

Avatar of Coral Triangle Written by Coral Triangle

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