Catch of the Week
Report Cites Emerging ‘Regional Identity’ for the Coral Triangle

Report Cites Emerging ‘Regional Identity’ for the Coral Triangle

Catch of the Week
Community involvement remains one of the keys in managing the Coral Triangle and its rich resources (Photo courtesy of Patrick Christie)

Community involvement remains one of the keys in managing the Coral Triangle and its rich resources (Photo courtesy of Patrick Christie)

Communications between leaders and vertical integration of regional and national management plans are giving rise to a Coral Triangle “regional identity.”

This emerging regional identity is just one of the key findings of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in its “Final Report: Lessons from the US Coral Triangle Initiative Support Program” which assessed ongoing efforts in protecting and saving precious resources in the Coral Triangle.

The USAID report said that continued effort should be focused on maintaining communications between the six member countries, communications that could in turn increase institutional and human capacity.

The implementation of tangible policies on regional problems such as climate change; illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing; or unsustainable trade will cement and validate the creation of a regional approach to ocean governance.

The report added that establishing linkages to regional and global institutions has also begun and could further be strengthened.

The Coral Triangle region has a wide range of socio-ecological conditions, cultures, histories, and capacities; and there are modest indications that socio-ecological conditions are improving in project sites across the region, the USAID report said.

The report added that the establishment of a marine protected area (MPA) system in the Coral Triangle is a “landmark accomplishment” particularly the establishment of MPAs in the Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Malaysia.

The USAID added that social network analysis and key informant interviews clearly document the progress toward and value of the regional and in-country networks that have been fostered.

Currently, the regional communication network, as measured, involves individuals from the US and Coral Triangle nations (and some from Australia and other countries). The international dimension of this network that includes individuals from both inside and outside the Coral Triangle countries is predictable and appropriate given the scope and cause of problems and need for capacity development.

The USAID report further said national policy makers and other participants are dedicated and interested in the continuation of national and regional learning networks from other countries both within and outside the Coral Triangle region.

(Story and photo courtesy of USAID)

 

DOWNLOAD: Final Report: Lessons from the US Coral Triangle Initiative Support Program

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