Catch of the Week
Replication Key to Successful ICM Programs

Replication Key to Successful ICM Programs

Catch of the Week

Replication and scaling up remain key components for the successful rollout of integrated coastal management programs in Asia and the Pacific.

Mishal Hamid, project manager, GEF/IW:LEARN international waters cluster, was one of the speakers at the GEF regional workshop held  March 2014 in Manila. (Photo by CTKN)

Mishal Hamid, project manager, GEF/IW:LEARN international waters cluster, was one of the speakers at the GEF regional workshop held March 2014 in Manila. (Photo by CTKN)

According to Mishal Hamid, project manager, GEF/IW:LEARN international waters cluster, there are integrated coastal management programs being implemented across the globe but the challenge is how to replicate successful implementations in certain regions and how to share this knowledge to other regions.

Hamid was one of the experts who participated in the “2nd GEF IW Regional Workshop for Asia and the Pacific on Transforming Good Practices from Demonstration Projects into Scaled-Up Investments and Financing in Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Management” held in Manila on 10 to 12 March 2014.

One of the key objectives of the conference, according to Hamid, was “to see if projects being implemented, as well as future projects, have more knowledge and guidance in scalability and replicability so they can deliver more global environmental benefits.”

Resource persons and experts from international organizations including the GEF, ADB, UNEP, WB, and the Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA), met to share knowledge and experience on the key aspects of replicating good practices in developing and implementing water resource management projects across Asia and the Pacific.

However, integrated coastal management projects in the Pacific and in Southeast Asia still need to be replicated and scaled up.

“The key question is, do these programs get replicated in other regions, and is there a specific guidance for project managers to replicate these ICM programs?” Hamid said.

The ultimate goal, according to Hamid, is for the health of the environment to improve, as a means to prove that global environmental benefits have been delivered. Benefits such as clean water for communities, and livelihood benefits, i.e. tourism, to name a few.

“But these projects need to be practical and should have more guidance. The key is to take action in one region, and hopefully this action gets ‘copied’ by another region,” Hamid concluded.

 

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